Julie Hogg

Julie Hogg (22)  Julie Hogg (16 Nov 1989) 

Under the changes to the double jeopody law, Billy Dunlop, 43 has been jailed for life for the murder of Julie Hogg in 1989. She was aged just 22 when she was murdered, and had had a brief relationship with Dunlop.

From the BBC (06 Oct 2006):

DOUBLE JEOPARDY MAN IS GIVEN LIFE

A man has been jailed for life after becoming the first person to be retried for murder in the wake of changes to the 800-year-old double jeopardy law.
Billy Dunlop, 43, was acquitted of the 1989 murder of Julie Hogg, of Billingham, Teesside, in 1991.

He later confessed to a prison officer while serving time for assault, but at that time the law prevented a retrial.

He was told he must serve a minimum of 17 years in prison after pleading guilty last month.

Until the double jeopardy law was changed in April 2005, anyone acquitted by a jury could not be retried for the same offence.

Dunlop could only be prosecuted for lying at his earlier trial and was given six years in jail for perjury.

‘Persistent campaign’

Julie Hogg’s mother, Ann Ming and her husband, Charlie, 81, travelled to London from Teesside, to see Dunlop jailed on Friday.

After sentence was passed Mrs Ming, who described Dunlop as “pure evil”, said: “I would have liked life to have meant life. Julie’s murder has devastated our family and left us in turmoil.

“I would like to thank everyone who has helped us in the long, tireless campaign for justice for our daughter Julie.

“We just hope after 17 years when he is eligible for parole and if I’m dead, somebody carries on the good work and keeps him behind bars so he will never, ever kill anybody else again.”

Earlier, in court, Mrs Ming sobbed as prosecutor Andrew Robertson, QC told the court: “Now the law has changed, in large part due to the long and persistent campaign by Mr and Mrs Ming who felt they and their daughter were being denied justice.”

An impact statement from Mrs Ming was read to the judge, Mr Justice Calvert-Smith.

In it, she told of the “indescribable” shock and after-effects of finding the body after police had failed to discover it during a search.

“As a family, we are damaged beyond repair and will never be the same again as Julie will never return home,” she said.

Ms Hogg, who was separated from her husband, had a son, Kevin, who was three when she was murdered.

He was not in court today, but his impact statement said: “I have missed out on a mother’s love.

“I have missed out on a childhood. I have never been able to understand why the man who killed my mother had not been caught by police and sent to prison.”

Timothy Owen QC, defending, said Dunlop had confessed through remorse and because he wanted to make a clean breast of his crime.

Mr Justice Calvert-Smith said he could not take into account violent crimes committed by Dunlop since the murder, but they would be considered by the Parole Board, which would eventually decide when he would be released.

Outside the court, Det Supt Dave Duffey, of Cleveland Police said: “The whole campaign has been based on Ann. She’s a determined, driven woman. I’ve got nothing but admiration for her.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that she’s been focal to changing the law.”

After the double jeopardy law was changed in April 2005 Cleveland Police re-opened the case into Ms Hogg’s murder.

The pizza delivery woman had been initially reported missing but her body was discovered months later behind a bath panel by her mother.

Dunlop, a labourer who lived nearby, was charged with the murder.

He faced two trials, but each time the jury failed to reach a verdict and he was formally acquitted in 1991.

The law change only applies to England and Wales. In Scotland the former ruling relating to double jeopardy rule still applies.

From The Guardian (06 Oct 2006):

DOUBLE JEOPARDY KILLER JAILED FOR LIFE

The killer who became the first person in UK legal history to be charged twice with the same offence – after the 800 year old double jeopardy law was changed – was today jailed for life.

A judge at the Old Bailey told William Dunlop that he would serve a minimum tariff of 17 years in prison for killing Julie Hogg, 22, in 1989.

The sentencing was the climax of a 15-year fight for justice by Ms Hogg’s mother, Ann Ming, 60, which was a major factor in having the double jeopardy laws changed.

Outside court, Ms Ming expressed some disappointment with the sentence, saying: “I would have liked life to have meant life. Julie’s murder has devastated our family and left us in turmoil.”
Dunlop, 43, had pleaded guilty to murder at the Old Bailey last month.

The disappearance of the pizza delivery worker, from Billingham, Teesside, in November 1989, was initially treated as a missing person inquiry. But 80 days after her disappearance, her mother discovered her partially mutilated body behind a bath panel in her daughter’s home.

Dunlop, a labourer who lived nearby and who had had a brief relationship with the victim, was formally cleared of her murder after two juries failed to reach verdicts.

However, after he was later jailed for another assault, he confessed to Ms Hogg’s murder in 1999 to a prison officer, boasting that there was nothing anyone could do about it.

The following year, he was jailed for six years for perjury. Earlier this year he was charged with Ms Hogg’s murder again after the double jeopardy law was changed in 2005.

Ms Ming and her husband, Charlie, 81, travelled to London from the family’s home in Billingham to see Dunlop jailed today.

In court, before sentencing, Ms Ming sobbed as prosecutor Andrew Robertson, QC, described her daughter’s injuries.

Mr Robertson said: “The overwhelming inference is that the deceased rejected him and was subjected to a violent sexual assault.”

Dunlop had said he strangled Ms Hogg after she taunted him about a black eye, but this was not accepted by the prosecution.

Mr Robertson told the court: “Now the law has changed, in large part due to the long and persistent campaign by Mr and Mrs Ming who felt they and their daughter were being denied justice.”

A statement from Ms Ming was read to the judge, Mr Justice Calvert-Smith. In it, she said the shock and after-effects of finding the body after police had failed to discover it during a search “verges on the indescribable”.

“To this day, I can still smell the putrefied smell which was our daughter,” she said. “As a family, we are damaged beyond repair and will never be the same again as Julie will never return home. The love we feel for Julie means it is we who are serving the life sentence.”

Timothy Owen QC, defending, said Dunlop had confessed through remorse and because he wanted to make a clean breast of his crime.

Mr Justice Calvert-Smith said: “It is impossible to comprehend the shock and horror felt by her mother as she pulled away the panel and discovered her remains.”

He said there were signs of sexual degradation to the body before it was concealed.

The judge said he could not take into account violent crimes committed by Dunlop since the murder, but they would be considered by the Parole Board, which would eventually decide when he would be released.

After the sentencing, Crown Prosecution Service lawyer Martin Goldman said: “William Dunlop is a dangerous killer whose sentence today reflects the premeditated and truly horrendous nature of his crime. He has tried to escape responsibility for the murder of Julie Hogg for nearly 20 years and has put her family through great suffering in the process.”

The change to the double jeopardy law applies in England and Wales but not in Scotland. There are currently no other ‘double jeopardy’ prosecutions active but lawyers involved in the prosecution of Dunlop have said they have been contacted by other lawyers interested in pursuing such cases.

William Dunlop (43)
   William Dunlop, life in prison, min. 17 years

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2 Responses to “Julie Hogg”

  1. Kath Matlock Says:

    Dear Ann Ming,
    I got your book from the library and couldn’t put it down. I was astonished to read that Dunlop got away with Julie’s murder twice and thought that was a total miscarriage of justice. He should be locked away for ever. I couldn’t believe the incompetence of the police. Thank heavens for people like you and your husband Charlie.
    Kath

  2. Adelyne Tjs Says:

    I am now reading FOR THE LOVE OF JULIE. I admire your strength and endurance.


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